GIMME SHELTER: A Raven Reading at Columbia City Gallery

RAVEN CHRONICLES PRESS & Columbia City Gallery present, in conjunction with GIMME SHELTER, the 12th Annual Juried Exhibit at the Columbia City Gallery:

A Selection of Readings From Raven Chronicles Journal, Vol. 24: HOME

September 18, 2017, Monday, 7:00pm., Free, Columbia City Gallery, 4864 Rainier Avenue South, Seattle

Readings by:
Dianne Aprile, Anna Bálint, Minnie Collins, Jim Cantú, Shankar Narayan;
& Recovery Café’s Safe Place Writing Circle students: Cathy Scott, Jay Scott.

In Vol. 24: HOME, Raven writers and artists address these questions: Is home a place or a dream of sanctuary? A tarp, bedroll or car parked on the side of the freeway? A ranch you inherited? People you love? A state of mind? An elusive definition of space or location that only the privileged can afford to claim?

GIMME SHELTER: Artists working in 2D, 3D and video, address issues of homelessness, gentrification and refugee dislocation. Exhibiting artists include: Dean Forbes, Laura Pierce, Grant Guenter, Carletta Carrington Wilson, Daniel Cautrell, Megan Cherry, Susan Marie Brundage, Annie Lewis, E. Valentine DeWald, Valerie Schurman, Dawn Endean, Wendy Call, Pamela Hobart, Vincent Samudovsky, Amy Wang, Zeynep Alev, Sally Ketcham, Ellen Hochberg, Sarah Dillon, Susan Cole, Stephanie Reid, Randy Warren, Frank Duckstein, Aram Falsafi, and Sharon Swanson.

http://www.columbiacitygallery.com

Workshop: Tracing the Map of Translation/ Trazando el mapa de la traducción

A workshop taught by
Eugenia Toledo and Carolyne Wright

Saturday, September 16, 2017, 1-4 pm
Raven Chronicles’ Office,  Jack Straw Cultural Center
909 N.E. 43rd St., Suite No. 205, Seattle, WA 98105

Fee: $20.00  (or $30: includes copy of book)

Register your intent to attend the workshop via email. Pay in person at workshop.
Contact Information:
Phoebe at 206-941-2955;  email editors@ravenchronicles.org or carolyne.eulene@juno.com

Literature in translation has been essential to our cultural understanding throughout time—and some of the most enduring and influential work that we read is in translation. Likewise, poetry in translation has been a major influence on poets over the generations. In recent decades, translating from the world’s major languages, as well as those less well-known, has become an increasingly common practice among poets of many cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

As translators to and from Spanish, Chilean poet Eugenia Toledo, and American poet, translator, and Fulbright grantee to Chile, Carolyne Wright, will read translations of poems from a number of Chilean poets (such as Pablo Neruda, Jorge Teillier, and Marjorie Agosín), and present poems from Eugenia’s new, bilingual volume in Carolyne’s translation, Trazas de mapa, trazas de sangre / Map Traces, Blood Traces (Mayapple Press).  Eugenia and Carolyne will talk about the variety of approaches to transforming Spanish-language poems into poetry in English. In some cases, where several translations exist of the same poem, we will compare the effectiveness of different versions. And we will try some translations of our own!  No prior experience with translation is required.

 

Art at the Hopvine Pub, Summer, 2017

Join Raven Chronicles May 29 to August 27, 2017, celebrating 3 local artists: John Hunter, Magda Baker, and Jamey Rahm; Hopvine Pub, 507 15th Avenue East, Capitol Hill neighborhood, Seattle. Curated by Les Morely.

Reading/Reception for Raven Chronicles Journal, Vol. 24

RAVEN CHRONICLES PRESS  & JACK STRAW CULTURAL CENTER present

A Reading & Reception for Raven Chronicles Journal Vol. 24: HOME
July 7, 2017
Friday, 7:00pm., Free
Jack Straw Cultural Center, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., University District, Seattle

What is there in history but a shape of being? A language structure that is place with its multiple meanings of places within place. —Diane Glancy

The place where I truly feel at home is in a book. This is where the real panoramas are. The landscapes of the human imagination. Oceans, raging rivers, philosophies, forests. Language is a wilderness and books are their reserves. —John Olson

After all, home changes, but stories—be they the stories of former occupants or the stories of travelers visiting a darkened chimney—live forever. —Nyri A. Bakkalian


MC Paul Hunter
Readings by:

Dianne Aprile, Anna Bálint, Jim Cantú, T. Clear, Mary E. Crane, Clare Johnson, Shankar Narayan, Linda Packard, Joannie Stangeland, Carolyne Wright; Recovery Café’s Safe Place Writing Circle readers.

Is home a place or a dream of sanctuary? A tarp, bedroll or car parked on the side of the freeway? A ranch you inherited? People you love? A state of mind? An elusive definition of space or location that only the privileged can afford to claim? Describe your home (whatever and wherever it may be) and the things that make it home for you. In Aleppo, “Abu Hussein, a man in his 50s, was remarkably cheerful as he stood with his wife Umm Hussein and looked down from their balcony on to the rubble that makes his street impassable for any vehicle. ‘Nothing is better or more beautiful than our home,’ he said. ‘It’s the place to be in good times or in bad.’ ”

Raven Chronicles is indebted to our 2017 co-sponsors for partial funding of our programs: Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture; 4Culture / King County Lodging Tax; ARTSWA/Washington State Arts Commission with NEA project support; and Jack Straw Cultural Center / Joan Rabinowitz, for co-sponsoring Raven readings, and for unflagging support for writers, literary groups, and music artists. And all Raven subscribers and donors.

Contact Information: ravenchronicles.org
206.941.2955, editors@ravenchronicles.org,
Mailing address: 15528 12th Ave. NE, Shoreline, WA 98155

Jamey Rahm: Art at the Hopvine Pub on Capitol Hill


Jamey Rahn, Upon Arrival, Charcoal on Paper/Oil on Paper.

July 30-September 2, 2017
Opening Reception August 10, Thursday, 7pm; Hopvine Pub, 507 15th Ave. East, Capitol Hill.

Since transplanting to Seattle from Brooklyn in 2014, Rahm began exploring Seattle and its surrounding areas working from direct observation.


2017 Art shows at the Hopvine Pub on Capitol Hill. Curated by Les Morely; Co-sponsored by the Raven Chronicles.

Listening to Stories for a Change

Join us for this exciting event. Thursday, April 27th, 5:30 to 7:30 PM, Walker-Ames Room, #225, Kane Hall, UW Campus. Followed by Q&A’s.

Words From the Cafe, An Anthology, edited by Anna Bálint: Raven Chronicles Press. Anna will discuss her work at the Recovery Café, and some of her students will read their work in the book.

Josephine Ensign will discuss her book,  Catching Homelessness.

Books will be on sale from UW Bookstore.

Sponsored by UW Health Sciences Schools and Health Equity Circle. Supported by Humanities Washington, Jack Straw Cultural Center, 4Culture, and Raven Chronicles Press.

 

 

Ingri (Rachel) Quon: Art at the Hopvine Pub on Capitol Hill


Ingri (Rachel) Quon, “Color Vacation,” prints on canvas from original watercolors.

April 3-May 6, 2017
Opening Reception April 6, 7pm; Closing Reception May 5, 7pm, Hopvine Pub, 507 15th Avenue East, Capitol Hill.

Quon lets inspiration flow through water and color to explore her environment and play with organic inspired shapes. Her vibrant watercolors are a catalyst for appreciating nature more deeply and seeing beauty in color and form.


2017 Art shows at the Hopvine Pub on Capitol Hill. Curated by Les Morely; Co-sponsored by the Raven Chronicles.

SoulFood Coffee House: March 16, 2017 — Raven Chronicles

Raven Chronicles is a Seattle-based literary organization established in 1991. It publishes and promotes work that embodies the cultural diversity of writers and artists living in the Pacific Northwest and other regions. It publishes two print magazines each year (summer and winter), and original work on its website. This reading features prose and poetry, and maybe a surprise or two.

Reading for Raven Chronicles are Anna Bálint (poetry), Robert Francis Flor (poetry), David Halpern (stories), Paul Hunter (poetry), and Maliha Masood (fiction).

https://sites.google.com/site/soulfoodpoetrynight/future-readings/march-16-2017

Anna Bálint is the author of Horse Thief, a collection of fiction that was a finalist for the Pacific Northwest Book Award. She has taught at El Centro de la Raza, Antioch University, and Hugo House. She is a teaching artist with Path With Art and Recovery Café in Seattle.

Robert Francis Flor was raised in Seattle’s Central Area/Rainier Valley. Several of his poems were published in anthologies: Voices of the Asian American Experience, from the University of Santa Cruz, and Where Are You From?, Thymos Book Project, Oregon. His chapbook, Alaskero Memories, was published by Carayan Press (2016).

David Halpern completed his Master’s degree at Brown University, and worked as a political writer and screenwriter for a decade before switching to a career making comic and wildlife flipbooks. He works as a Washington State Park Ranger, and writes with humor about the not-always-funny act of aging.

Paul Hunter’s work has been published in seven books and three chapbooks. His first collection of farming poems, Breaking Ground, Silverfish Review Press, was reviewed in the New York Times, and received the 2004 Washington State Book Award. He has been a featured poet on The News Hour.

Maliha Masood was born and raised in Pakistan. She is the author of travel memoirs Zaatar Days, Henna Nights: Adventures, Dreams, and Destinations Across the Middle East (Seal Press, 2006) and Dizzy in Karachi: A Journey to Pakistan (Booktrope Editions, 2013). Her work has been featured on NPR and PBS.

Art at the Hopvine Pub, Nov. 1-Nov. 27. Reception Nov. 3rd.

Hopvine-fall-winter_poster-2016

Curated by Les Morely;
Co-sponsored by Raven Chronicles.

Hopvine Pub, Capitol Hill Neighborhood,
507 15th Avenue East, Seattle, WA 98112

 


John Dlouhy, “Lost Time,” Digital Prints. 11/1-11/27/16. Artist Reception: Thursday 11/3 at 7:00 pm

Dlouhy sifts through art historical references for images that resonate and then processed these images with digital tools to achieve a layering that speaks to memory, distortion, pattern and color.

And (this is a double exhibit):

Maggie Murphy, “Sea Knots,” Linocut Relief and Reduction Prints. 11/1-11/27/16. Artist Reception: Thursday 11/3 at 7:00 pm

Murphy’s process involves developing personally-charged, symbolic images, or, sometimes, images that provide spiritual refuge. These intricate prints are created using a multi-layered, multi-plate process and reductive printing methods.


Daniel Michael Viox, “On Nature, Time and Patience,” Acrylic on Wood. 12/1-12/31/16. Artist Reception: Thursday 12/8 at 7:00 pm

Viox is inspired by patterns of nature, geological formations, precious stones, topographical maps, and satellite imagery of the earth. He believes in the transformative power of art, myth, and metaphor.

 

A Reading & Reception, Celebrating a new book & CD: Words From the Café, from Raven Chronicles Press

Cover photo: Ginny Banks
Cover photo: Ginny Banks

RAVEN CHRONICLES PRESS & JACK STRAW CULTURAL CENTER
present

A Reading & Reception, Celebrating a new book & CD:

Words From the Café

with MC/Host Anna Bálint

October 7, 2016, Friday, 7:00pm., Free

Jack Straw Cultural Center, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E. University District, Seattle

Readings by:

• Johnnie Powell

• Taumstar

• Angel Ybarra

• Bang Nguyen

• Megan McInnis

• Tamar Hirsch

• Donald W. Butler

• Steve Torres

• Esmeralda Hernandez

• Mary Jo El-Wattar

Every Friday at Seattle’s Recovery Café, people struggling with addiction or mental illness or homelessness come together in Anna Bálint’s Safe Place Writing Circle to write and share writing. Here they discover their own unique voices and ways of shaping language to write stories and poems as part of reclaiming their lives. Anna’s 2015 residency with the Artist Support Program at Jack Straw, and funding from 4Culture, made it possible to capture some of the magic that takes place each week in Words From the Café, a book/CD compilation. These are voices that need to be heard. Their literary diversity and range of human experience fly in the face of prevailing stereotypes of some of the most marginalized members of our society.

Thanks to Recovery Café, 4Culture, Jack Straw Cultural Center and Raven Chronicles for making this program possible. Contact Information: ravenchronicles.org

206.941.2955, editors@ravenchronicles.org, Mailing address: 15528 12th Ave. NE, Shoreline, WA 98155