BRIDGES NOT WALLS

Bridges Not Walls Logo

BRIDGES Not Walls – sponsored by Los Norteños, Juan Alonso-Rodriguez, and The Raven Chronicles. February 28, 5-7 pm, Juan Alonso-Rodriguez Gallery, 306 S. Washington St,. #104, Seattle.

In the interest of building bridges, not walls, in the current climate of distrust, fear, and uncertainty, we invite you to participate in a modest cultural experiment. Juan Alonso-Rodriguez, visual artist and gallery owner, has invited us to present a literary evening in his Front Room Gallery on February 28, 5 – 7 pm.

Writers will work mostly in pairs. Given ten minutes, they can split the time and each read original work for five minutes, collaborate on a new creation that uses all ten minutes, or choose a third person or party to use their time. Song, poetry, prose, and theater are invited.
 How well do you share?  Who’s voice are you displacing by insisting on your own? Who should be in Juan’s front room who is, for some reason, denied access?

Readings/Performances by:

M.C. Kathleen Alcalá

Elena Camarillo / Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs

José Carrillo / Carmelo Gonzalez

Jim Cantu / Marta Sanchez

Anita Endrezze / Maiah Merino

Break: Jacque Larrainzar, music presentation

Catalina Marie Cantú / Robert Frances Flor

Raul Sanchez / Kathleen Alcalá

Phoebe Bosché / Anna Bálint

Donna Miscolta / Carletta Carrington Wilson

Art at the Hopvine Pub, Nov. 1-Nov. 27. Reception Nov. 3rd.

Hopvine-fall-winter_poster-2016

Curated by Les Morely;
Co-sponsored by Raven Chronicles.

Hopvine Pub, Capitol Hill Neighborhood,
507 15th Avenue East, Seattle, WA 98112

 


John Dlouhy, “Lost Time,” Digital Prints. 11/1-11/27/16. Artist Reception: Thursday 11/3 at 7:00 pm

Dlouhy sifts through art historical references for images that resonate and then processed these images with digital tools to achieve a layering that speaks to memory, distortion, pattern and color.

And (this is a double exhibit):

Maggie Murphy, “Sea Knots,” Linocut Relief and Reduction Prints. 11/1-11/27/16. Artist Reception: Thursday 11/3 at 7:00 pm

Murphy’s process involves developing personally-charged, symbolic images, or, sometimes, images that provide spiritual refuge. These intricate prints are created using a multi-layered, multi-plate process and reductive printing methods.


Daniel Michael Viox, “On Nature, Time and Patience,” Acrylic on Wood. 12/1-12/31/16. Artist Reception: Thursday 12/8 at 7:00 pm

Viox is inspired by patterns of nature, geological formations, precious stones, topographical maps, and satellite imagery of the earth. He believes in the transformative power of art, myth, and metaphor.

 

An Unevenly Distributed Future

Matt Briggs discussing writers and technology, on 2/4/16 at Seattle Central College Library
Matt Briggs discussing writers and technology, on 2/4/16 at Seattle Central College Library

by Matt Briggs

It is hardly news to anyone in Seattle that humanity over the entire planet is experiencing an unprecedented rate of technological change. In Seattle this is visible in entire neighborhoods replaced in the last ten years. According to Governing Magazine, Seattle has experienced a 50% gentrification rate since 2000, compared to a 40% rate in the 1990s. Cleveland, in contrast, has experienced a 6.7% rate since 2000. In Seattle, to travel to a new city, you only have to spend an afternoon watching a movie. You will find a new skyline when you go outside. Major shifts such as the movement from stone to metal tools, from hunting and gathering to agriculture, or from human labor to mechanical labor, once took place over millennia or centuries. Since the end of the 19th century, however, we have experienced a continual and increasingly rapid succession of equally large technological shifts: the internal combustion engine, the rise of machines capable of computation, nuclear power, global communication networks, the spread of pervasive data collection, and automation of complex information and physical systems.

Continue reading An Unevenly Distributed Future

Patrons, Revolutions, Romantics, and Boarding House Reach:

Paul Hunter discussing writers and technology, on 2/4/16, at Seattle Central College Library
Paul Hunter discussing writers and technology, on 2/4/16, at Seattle Central College Library

Pursuing a Life in the Literary Arts

by Paul Hunter

During the last four thousand years, where art existed at all, for most artists making a living meant begging from those in power. Historians call it patronage, though most of it went without saying, part of the facts of life absorbed by osmosis. Some rich person, king or noble, bishop or abbot, cardinal or pope would be approached by an artist, a painter or sculptor or poet, and if the rich person liked what he saw, the two might arrive at an understanding whereby the artist would be clothed and fed, perhaps given supplies and a stipend along with a series of commissions which were really command performances. He might also sometimes be given a tedious, responsible job as personal secretary or teacher of the rich man’s kids, in return for his work being sponsored, tacitly approved, owned and enjoyed by the wealthy man and his family. If the artist remained properly subservient, the arrangement might be lifelong. To some extent patronage still goes on today, politely veiled through a couple of mechanisms I will come to in a minute.

Continue reading Patrons, Revolutions, Romantics, and Boarding House Reach: