The Wall, poem by Anita Endrezze

Build a wall of saguaros,

butterflies, and bones

of those who perished

in the desert. A wall of worn shoes,

dry water bottles, poinsettias.

Construct it of gilded or crazy house

mirrors so some can see their true faces.

Build a wall of revolving doors

or revolutionary abuelas.

Make it as high as the sun, strong as tequila.

Boulders of sugar skulls. Adobe or ghosts.

A Lego wall or bubble wrap. A wall of hands

holding hands, hair braided from one woman

to another, one country to another.

A wall made of Berlin. A wall made for tunneling.

A beautiful wall of taco trucks.

A wall of silent stars and migratory songs.

This wall of solar panels and holy light,

panels of compressed cheetos,

topped not by barbed wire but sprouting

avocado seeds, those Aztec testicles.

A wall to keep Us in and Them out.

It will have faces and heartbeats.

Dreams will be terrorists. The Wall will divide

towns, homes, mountains,

the sky that airplanes fly through

with their potential illegals.

Our wallets will be on life support

to pay for it. Let it be built

of guacamole so we can have a bigly block party.

Mortar it with xocoatl, chocolate. Build it from coyote howls

and wild horses drumming across the plains of Texas,

from the memories

of hummingbird warriors and healers.

Stack it thick as blood, which has mingled

for centuries, la vida. Dig the foundation deep.

Create a 2,000 mile altar, lit with votive candles

for those who have crossed over

defending freedom under spangled stars

and drape it with rebozos,

and sweet grass.

Make it from two-way windows:

the wind will interrogate us,

the rivers will judge us, for they know how to separate

and divide to become whole.

Pink Floyd will inaugurate it.

Ex-Presidente Fox will give it the middle finger salute.

Wiley Coyote will run headlong into it,

and survive long after history forgets us.

Bees will find sand-scoured holes and fill it

with honey. Heroin will cover it in blood.

But it will be a beautiful wall. A huge wall.

Remember to put a rose-strewn doorway in Nogales

where my grandmother crossed over,

pistols on her hips. Make it a gallery of graffiti art,

a refuge for tumbleweeds,

a border of stories we already know by heart.


Included in Raven Chronicles Journal, Volume 24: HOME, 2017


Anita Endrezze, poet and artist, continues to move between the almost impassable wall of MS and the freedom of a world open to art and multicultural ideas. She was inspired to write her poem “The Wall” (pg 22) to protest in a literal and symbolic way. Her grandmother came from Mexico a hundred years ago. A recent altered-book project will be archived in the Smithsonian. She also writes fiction and poetry. Her latest collection of poems and art appear in the chapbook, A Thousand Branches, by Red Bird Press.

Chris Crites: Bag Paintings

Hopvine Pub presents

Bag Paintings
by Chris Crites

February 4, 2018 —March 4, 2018
Artist Reception: February 15, 7pm

Hopvine Pub, Capitol Hill, 507 15th Avenue East, Seattle

Questions/Contact Information: Scott Martin 206-898-5460,
Hopvine 206-328-3120; email: scott.martin97@gmail.com,
Chris Crites: bagpainter.com

For over 18 years, Chris Crites has used the brown paper bag as his canvas to examine criminal portraits from the past as well as crime scenes and accidents from history. Crites painted his first four mug shots in acrylic on paper bag in 1999. Seriously focusing on the subject matter of arrest photographs since 2002, he has developed and refined his brightly-colored, limited palette style. Adding crimes scenes, accidents, commissioned portraiture, mushroom clouds, nudes and firearms to his body of work, Crites has shown and been published across the United States and Europe. This includes six paintings in a six month group show at the Hallé St. Pierre Museum in Paris, France, in 2015. His artwork is represented in San Francisco by Jack Fischer Gallery. He is also an independent curator and lives in Seattle with his wife and cats. Check out his work at bagpainter.com


Co-sponsored by Raven Chronicles. Curated by Les Morely. Thanks to 4culture/King County lodging tax, Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, and ArtsWA/Washington State Arts Commission with NEA funding, for partial funding of our 2017-18 programs. www.ravenchronicles.org

WORKSHOP: STORYTELLING FOR POETS, ESSAYISTS & FICTION WRITERS

A workshop taught by Paul Hunter

Saturday February 17, 2018, 4:30-6 pm, Free
BookTree Bookstore, 609 Market Street, Kirkland, WA 98033

Questions & Contact Information:
Chris at 425-202-7791,
Paul at 206-633-5647,
email: editors@ravenchronicles.org

This workshop is organized to clarify where we stand with regard to the natural world, what our place is, and offer some exercises and materials to allow the writer to abandon the old stories and create new ones that will be more urgent and meaningful than the aesthetics and ethics most of us have grown up with. What perspectives will help us, and what stories do we now most need to tell each other and hear? Bring something to write with, and on, and join me from 4:30 pm to 6 pm, Saturday February 17, at Book Tree in Kirkland. Serious nuts and bolts—there will be no preaching to the choir.

It’s not often that poets and writers get a chance to save the world. But here we are, on the verge of environmental disaster, dying for want of what every human should live for—a life in tune with nature. While honing our sense of beauty and utility, we have traded an active life and a sustainable existence for comfort, convenience, and amusement, which tend to magnify our energy use exponentially, and diminish the sense of our surroundings and our physical selves.

In his 2017 book, Confessions of a Recovering Environmentalist, English novelist, poet, and political activist Paul Kingsnorth details his own despair at seeing how entrenched, immoveable, and oblivious is the resistance to global climate change. In despair he resigned from all organized efforts to save the earth, and is living a subsistence life with his family in western Ireland, with a low carbon footprint, raising as much of his food and fuel as he can, using a composting toilet. His only remaining hold is in the world of art, where he sees that humans have been failing by continuing to tell each other versions of the old failed stories. He says that humans need to begin telling each other new stories that might save us and the rest of nature, though the hour is late. (see dark-mountain.net, for magazine issues, books, and blogs)


Paul Hunter has published fine letterpress poetry under the imprint of Wood Works Press since 1994. His poems have appeared in numerous journals, as well as in seven full-length books and three chapbooks. His first collection of farming poems, Breaking Ground, 2004, from Silverfish Review Press, was reviewed in The New York Times, and received the 2004 Washington State Book Award. A second volume of farming poems, Ripening, was published in 2007, a third companion volume, Come the Harvest, appeared in 2008, and the fourth, from the same publisher, Stubble Field, appeared in 2012. He has been a featured poet on The News Hour, and has a prose book on small-scale, sustainable farming, One Seed to Another: The New Small Farming, published by the Small Farmer’s Journal. His new book of prose poetry, Clownery, In lieu of a life spent in harness, was published in 2017, by Davila Art & Books, Sisters, Oregon. Hunter taught at the U.W, Overlake School, and the Skagit River Poetry Festival for many years.

Reading/Publication Party for Raven Chronicles Vol. 25: Balancing Acts

RAVEN CHRONICLES PRESS & BookTree, an Independent Bookstore present

A Reading & Reception for Raven Chronicles Journal Vol. 25: Balancing Acts

February 17, 2018, Saturday,  6:15-7:30pm Free
BookTree Bookstore, 609 Market Street, Kirkland, WA 98033, 425-202-7791

Readings by:

MC: Paul Hunter, Luther Allen, Ed Harkness, Alicia Hokanson,
Thomas Hubbard, Jill McCabe Johnson, Jed Myers, Mary Ellen Talley

Join us for an Open Mic to follow the reading, 7:30-8:20pm.


Luther Allen writes poems and designs buildings from Sumas Mountain, Washington. He facilitates SpeakEasy, a community poetry reading series in Bellingham, Washington, and is co-editor of Noisy Water, a poetry anthology featuring local Whatcom County poets. His collection of poems, The View from Lummi Island, can be found at http://othermindpress.wordpress.com. His work appears in three recent anthologies: WA 129 (an anthology of poems from Washington poets, edited by Tod Marshall), Refugium, and Poetry of the American Southwest, Volume 3.

Edward Harkness is the author of two full-length poetry collections, Saying the Necessary and Beautiful Passing Lives, both from Pleasure Boat Studio Press. His poems can be found online in 2River, Atticus Review, Cascadia Review, The Good Men Project, Hinchas de Poesia, The Humanist, Rat’s Ass Journal, Salt River Review, Split Lip Magazine, Switched-On Gutenberg, and Terrain.Org. Recent publications in print journals include Chariton Review and Miramar. His most recent chapbook, Ice Children, was published by Split Lip Press in 2014. To hear Ed read “Union Creek in Winter,” (and published, not incidentally, on Jan. 21, 2017, the day of the inauguration of #45), go to Terrain.org at http://www.terrain.org/2017/poetry/letter-to-america-harkness/. He lives in Shoreline, Washington.

Alicia Hokanson, retired from forty years of teaching, now devotes her time to reading, writing, and political activism in Seattle and on Waldron Island, Washington. Her first collection of poems, Mapping the Distance, was selected by Carolyn Kizer for a King County Arts Commission Publication Prize. Two chapbooks from Brooding Heron Press are Insistent in the Skin and Phosphorous.

Thomas Hubbard, a retired writing instructor and spoken word performer, authored Nail and other hardworking poems, Year of the Dragon Press, 1994; Junkyard Dogz (also available on audio CD); and Injunz, a chapbook. He designed and published Children Remember Their Fathers (an anthology), and books by seven other authors. His book reviews have appeared in Square Lake, Raven Chronicles, New Pages and The Cartier Street Review. Recent publication credits include poems in Yellow Medicine Review, I Was Indian, editor Susan Deer Cloud, Florida Review, and short stories in Red Ink and Yellow Medicine Review. He serves editorially with Raven Chronicles and The Cartier Street Review, and still performs spoken word in and around Seattle, and at other venues around the country.

Paul Hunter has published fine letterpress poetry under the imprint of Wood Works Press since 1994. His poems have appeared in numerous journals, as well as in seven full-length books and three chapbooks. His first collection of farming poems, Breaking Ground, 2004, from Silverfish Review Press, was reviewed in The New York Times, and received the 2004 Washington State Book Award. A
second volume of farming poems, Ripening, was published in 2007, a third companion volume, Come the Harvest, appeared in 2008, and the fourth, from the same publisher, Stubble Field, appeared in 2012. He has been a featured poet on The News Hour, and has a prose book on small-scale, sustainable farming, One Seed to Another: The New Small Farming, published by the Small Farmer’s Journal. His new book of prose poetry, Clownery, In lieu of a life spent in harness, was published in 2017, by Davila Art & Books, Sisters, Oregon.

Jill McCabe Johnson is the author of two poetry books, Revolutions We’d Hoped We’d Outgrown and Diary of the One Swelling Sea, winner of a Nautilus Book Award, and the nonfiction chapbook Borderlines. Honors include an Artist Trust grant, an Academy of American Poets Award, the Mari Sandoz/Prairie Schooner Prize in Fiction, and Scissortale Review’s Editor’s Prize in Poetry; plus the Deborah Tall Memorial Fellowship from Pacific Lutheran University—where she completed her MFA in Creative Writing—and the Louise Van Sickle Fellowship in Poetry from the University of Nebraska—where she received her PhD in English. Johnson teaches Creative Writing and English at Skagit Valley College, and is the founding director of Artsmith, a non-profit to support the arts.

Jed Myers is author of Watching the Perseids (Sacramento Poetry Center), The Marriage of Space and Time (MoonPath Press, forthcoming), and two chapbooks. Recent honors include the Prime Number Magazine Award for Poetry, The Southeast Review’s Gearhart Poetry Prize, and the McLellan Poetry Prize. Poems are forthcoming in Poetry Northwest, Southern Poetry Review, and Natural Bridge. He’s Poetry Editor for the online magazine Bracken.

Mary Ellen Talley’s poems have recently been published in Cirque, U City Review, and Ekphrastic Review, as well as in the anthologies, The Doll Collection and Raising Lilly Ledbetter: Women Poets Occupy the Workspace. Mary Ellen worked for many years with words and children as a Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) in Seattle public schools.

Neighborhood Crows, Poem by Edward Harkness

In lazy flight this afternoon, they resemble
scraps of crepe blown aloft above the sunlit
crowns of firs. They’re my aloof neighbors.
All their guttural utterances are black, cynical,

feathered with irony. The point is, they mutter,
there’s no point. They clean up our messes.
In the corner of a field they hop to a scrap
of burger still in its silver wrapper.

Tolerant as Lao Tzu, plain as nickels, they gather
on wires in squads of nine. Earning a living,
they know, depends on luck, a canny eye
and magic, which explains their sorcerer’s robes,

glossy as lacquered shadows at twilight.
Like the universe, they do not judge.
They have no comment on the divorce rate
or the attendance of gangsters at church.

Instead, they’re the lamplighters of old, lighting stars
to signal day’s end as they pass over power lines.
Imponderable, ordinary, like night itself,
they spread their wings to shelter their young,

invite their friends to dinner in a ditch
or near an upturned garbage can. When threatened
by a hawk they call in reinforcements to harry
the intruder, distracting hunter away from the hunted.

At dawn they reappear, routine as soot
but wiser. For crows are learned monks
in vacant lots, beggars who take the vow
of poverty and then take over the city.

Crows have nothing to teach, nothing to sell.
They joke, cajole, bicker and tend
to their families. They are Zen masters
of the art of blending in, always making the best

of a bad situation, as poets do who know
it’s hopeless but go on anyway with their crow visions
and dark pronouncements, feigning nonchalance
when we fail to understand their off-the-cuff

commentaries, those suggestions they offer in order
to survive the coming apocalypse. If we paid attention,
we might even learn something—not merely
how to face the day when the comet strikes or the missiles

rise from their silos, but how to live in the now,
how to start anew, how to be better than we’ve been
and, despite the madness of our time,
how to get along with our neighbors, how to thrive.


Edward Harkness is the author of two full-length poetry collections, Saying the Necessary and Beautiful Passing Lives, both from Pleasure Boat Studio Press. His poems can be found online in 2River, Atticus Review, Cascadia Review, The Good Men Project, Hinchas de Poesia, The Humanist, Rat’s Ass Journal, Salt River Review, Split Lip Magazine, Switched-On Gutenberg, and Terrain.Org. Recent publications in print journals include Chariton Review and Miramar. His most recent chapbook, Ice Children, was published by Split Lip Press in 2014. To hear Ed read “Union Creek in Winter,” (and published, not incidentally, on Jan. 21, 2017, the day of the inauguration of #45), go to Terrain.org at http://www.terrain.org/2017/poetry/letter-to-america-harkness/.

He lives in Shoreline, Washington.

Art at the Hopvine Pub, Winter, 2017-2018


Join Raven Chronicles January 6 to March 4, 2018, celebrating 2 local artists: Irene Akio, and Chris Crites; @ Hopvine Pub, 507 15th Avenue East, Capitol Hill neighborhood, Seattle. Curated by Les Morely, co-sponsored by Raven Chronicles.

 

Irene Akio, “Ordinary People”
January 6-February 3, 2018. 
With this body of work Akio chose to explore portraits of ordinary people, both friends and strangers she has come across in her everyday life. She used bright pastels to emphasize the radiance in each of us.

Chris Crites, “Bag Paintings”
February 4-March 4, 2018. Artist reception Thursday, February 15, 7:00 pm. 
For over 18 years, Crites has used the brown paper bag as his canvas to examine criminal portraits from the past, as well as crime scenes and accidents from history.

 

“I Feel Both Ways,” Drawings & Paintings by Clare Johnson

November 18, 2017—January 6, 2018
Artist Reception: Thursday Dec. 7, 7p.m.
Hopvine Pub, Capitol Hill
507 15th Avenue East, Seattle

Questions/Contact Information:
Scott Martin 206-898-5460
Hopvine 206-328-3120; email:scott.martin97@gmail.com
www.clarejohnson.com

Exhibition Statement: In life, opposing truths, experiences, and feelings often exist together. Our usual forms of communication are unequipped to express this, however, without one reality becoming the dominant or right one, or both negating each other. I Feel Both Ways celebrates a large-scale drawing of the same name that was two years in the making, but also speaks to how Johnson uses art to say multiple things at once. Her work is inspired by the idea of a band-aid, a profoundly ordinary object that means two things at the same time—healing attention, and a wound. The acrylic paintings are both a way of traveling back to specific past moments, and an expression of the impossibility of really doing so. Likewise, she draws to find comfort; each ink drawing comes from a feeling of unease but is also the thing that soothed it. Clare Johnson is a writer and visual artist. Honors include a Michael S. Harper Poetry Prize, Jack Straw Writing Fellowship, Artist Trust Grant for Artist Projects (to expand her series of drawings based on favorite books), 4Culture funding (to make art to be used as giant interactive digital backdrops for the play Our Town), and the Grand Prize in Allied Arts Foundation’s 2017 Emerging Artist Grant Awards. Her ongoing “Post-it Note Project” (drawing/writing on a post-it each night to remember something from the day) was featured in Real Change, Seattle Magazine, Seattle Weekly, and Seattle Review of Books.


Co-sponsored by Raven Chronicles and Hopvine Pub. Curated by Les Morely. Thanks to 4Culture/King County lodging tax, Office of Arts & Culture: Seattle, and ArtsWA/Washington State Arts Commission with NEA funding, for partial funding of our 2017 programs. www.ravenchronicles.org

2018 Raven Chronicles Pushcart Prize Nominations


The editors of Raven Chronicles, A Journal of Art, Literature & The Spoken Word, are pleased to announce our nominations for the 2018 Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses series, the prize chosen by Pushcart Press that anthologizes the best of the small presses publishing this year. The editors of Raven Chronicles nominate the following writers for their work published in Vol. 24 and Vol. 25, in 2017.

From Vol. 25, November, 2017: Balancing Acts—

1. Fiona Farrell, “Decline and Fall on Savage Street”— Novel Excerpt, pgs. 57-68. Novel excerpt from Decline and Fall on Savage Street, Penguin Random House, New Zealand, 2017.

2. Edward Harkness “Neighborhood Crows”— poem, pgs. 22-23.

3. Nic Low, “Ear to the Ground”— essay, pgs 77-90. “Ear to the Ground,” first published in longer form in Griffith Review 35: Surviving, January, 2012 (https://griffithreview.com/articles/ear-to-the-ground/).

From Vol. 24, June, 2017: HOME—

4. Diane Glancy, “It Is Over There by That Place, A Remix of English Influenced by the Loss of the Native Language”— essay, pg. 120-122.

5. Tom Hunley, “Tom Tripped On A Loose Stair And An Angelic Choir Sounded Like Falling Rain”— poem, pg. 130.

6. John Olson, “Yesterday’s Rain”— essay, pgs. 165-168.

Reading & Reception for Raven Chronicles, Vol. 25: Balancing Acts

RAVEN CHRONICLES PRESS  & JACK STRAW CULTURAL CENTER
A Reading & Reception for Raven Chronicles Journal Vol. 25, Balancing Acts
December 15, 2017, Friday, 7:00pm., Free
Jack Straw Cultural Center, 4261 Roosevelt Way N.E., University District, Seattle

MC Anna Bálint
Readings by: Avis Adams, Kathleen Alcalá,
Deborrah Corr, Anne Frantilla, Ed Harkness, Thomas Hubbard, Paul Hunter, Jed Myers, Heidi Seaborn, Willie Smith. & Recovery Café’s Safe Place Writing Circle readers: vivan linder levi, Dana Nelson Dudley.

Raven Chronicles Journal Vol. 25: writers and artists examine the theme “Balancing Acts,” how we live our life, fully, and maintain our relationship with the earth/planet and the diversity of life on it. Biodiversity is balance in the dance of nature. Edited by: Anna Bálint, Phoebe Bosché, Matt Briggs, Paul Hunter, Doug Johnson. The U.S. contributors in this Balancing Acts-themed Journal live in seventeen states—Washington, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, California, Oregon, Illinois, New Jersey, , Virginia, Idaho, New York, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Alabama, Wisconsin, Florida, Washington, D.C.; and 52% are from Washington State. Contributors, particularly visual artists, also hail from ten countries—U.S., Germany, Colombia, Russia, Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Canada, Chile, Singapore. There are 58 illustrations/artworks in Vol. 25. We are pleased to present the work of a selection of established and emerging writers from New Zealand as part of the Sister Cities Program, a collaboration between Seattle and Christchurch, New Zealand.

Raven Chronicles is indebted to our 2017 co-sponsors for partial funding of our programs: Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture; 4Culture/King County Lodging Tax; ARTSWA/Washington State Arts Commission with NEA Project Support; and Jack Straw Cultural Center/Joan Rabinowitz, for co-sponsoring Raven readings, and for unflagging support for writers, literary groups, and music artists. And all Raven subscribers and donors.

Contact Information: ravenchronicles.org; 206.941.2955; editors@ravenchronicles.org,
Mailing address: 15528 12th Ave. NE, Shoreline, WA 98155

 

N E W S R E L E A S E: Raven Chronicles Journal, Vol. 24, HOME, Edited by Kathleen Alcalá, Anna Bálint, Phoebe Bosché, Paul Hunter & Stephanie Lawyer

Raven Chronicles Journal, Vol. 24, HOME, Edited by Kathleen Alcalá, Anna Bálint, Phoebe Bosché, Paul Hunter & Stephanie Lawyer

Raven Chronicles Journal, Vol. 24, HOME, features the work of 14 artists /and 68 writers from 21 states and 3 countries (Canada, India, Nigeria).

The place where I truly feel at home is in a book. This is where the real panoramas are. The landscapes of the human imagination. Oceans, raging rivers, philosophies, forests. Language is a wilderness and books are their reserves. —John Olson

What is there in history but a shape of being? A language structure that is place with its multiple meanings of places within place. —Diane Glancy

The world is in the midst of the largest migration of people since World War II. Due to war and political oppression, many of them will never return to their homelands. Others, like Native Americans in the Americas, have watched as wave after wave of newcomers have come on their land and claimed it as their own. The United States attracts people from all over the world to use as labor, but then denies many of them a legal opportunity to establish homes and raise families. Is home a place or a dream of sanctuary? A tarp, bedroll or car parked on the side of the freeway? A ranch you inherited? People you love? A state of mind? An elusive definition of space or location that only the privileged can afford to claim? In Aleppo, “Abu Hussein, a man in his 50s, was remarkably cheerful as he stood with his wife Umm Hussein and looked down from their balcony on to the rubble that makes his street impassable for any vehicle. ‘Nothing is better or more beautiful than our home,’ he said. ‘It’s the place to be in good times or in bad.’ ”


Raven Chronicles Press
To Order: www.ravenchronicles.org; Amazon.com (books)
Press Contact: Phoebe Bosche: editors@ravenchronicles.org
Published June 7, 201
6 x 0.7 x 9, 306 pp., paper, $11.99


Words From the Café by Megan McInnis, Johnnie Powell, Cathy Scott, Jay Scott, and  Susan Tekola.

 Fiction by Jennifer Clark, Cheryce (Chy) Clayton, Clare Johnson, Gina LaLonde, Don Noel, Sue Gale Pace, Michael Philips, J.R. Robinson, & Terry Sanville.

Essays/nonfiction by Michael Dylan Welch, Inye Wokoma, Maria de Los Angeles, Diane Glancy, Thomas Hubbard, John Olson, Susan Noyes Platt, Maiah Merino, and Rebecca F. Reuter.

Poetry by Anna Bálint, Anita Endrezze, T. Clear, Larry Eickstaedt, Paul Hunter, Mark Trechock, Jim Cantú, Soonest Nathaniel, Luther Allen, Dianne Aprile, Virginia Barrett, Michele Bombardier, Elizabeth Burnam, Minnie Collins, Mary Eliza Crane, Larry Crist, Jenny Davis, Risa Denenberg, Patrick Dixon, Penny Harter, Tanya McDonald, Michael Dylan Welch, Sharon Hashimoto, Tom Hunley, Sarah Jones, J.I. Kleinberg, Charles Leggett, Joan McBride, Marjorie Maddox, Kate Miller, Kevin Miller, Shankar Narayan, Linda Packard, David J.S. Pickering, Robert Ronnow, Frank Rossini, Judith Skillman, Joannie Stangeland, Alison Stone, Angie Trudell Vasquez, Diana Woodcock, and Carolyne Wright.

Art/Illustrations by David Anderson, Nyri A. Bakkalian, Anna Bálint, Maria de Los, Angeles, Gabe Hales, Clare Johnson (featured artist), Srilatha Malladi, Michael C. Paul, Jenn Powers, Rebecca Pyle (cover artist), Robert Ransom, Inye Wokoma, Saint James Harris Wood, Bill Yake.

The place where I truly feel at home is in a book. This is where the real panoramas are. The landscapes of the human imagination. Oceans, raging rivers, philosophies, forests. Language is a wilderness and books are their reserves. —John Olson

What is there in history but a shape of being? A language structure that is place with its multiple meanings of places within place. —Diane Glancy